Foreword to A Walk in the Thai Sun

Recently I published a Foreword to a new novel by Greg McKitrick, A Walk in the Thai Sun. This book is a detective novel with a twist. Every detective novel has twists, but this one twists toward an exploration of Christian faith as it unfolds in the unbelieving heart of the protagonist, a retired police detective whose missionary son has been murdered. Have a look at the book trailer, and here’s my Foreword:Continue reading

Twenty-One Candles: Foreword

Ron Reed, the Artistic Director of Pacific Theatre in Vancouver, has written a splendid Foreword to my new book Twenty-One Candles. Ron or I will be reading from my book at all the performances of Christmas Presence, PT’s annual celebration of the season with an evening of stories and wonderful music. Find out more on the PT website. And here’s Ron’s Foreword:

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Print Interview: Champagne for the Soul

Interview with Mike about Champagne for the Soul

(The interviewer is Rosanne Farnden Lyster of InCourage magazine.)

“Happiness has not been my strong suit, which is why I needed to experiment with joy.” So writes Mike Mason in the introduction to his book Champagne for the Soul. In October of 1999 Mason began an unusual experiment. The best selling Canadian author of The Mystery of Marriage, and a man who confesses to having experienced a good deal of moodiness and depression in his life, decided to be deliberately joyful in the Lord for a full 90 days. The idea itself bloomed out of tragedy, but led to a renewed Mike Mason and a book that chronicles the wandering of one man into joy. Mason spoke with InCourage about what joy is, and isn’t, and how you and I can also dwell in joy.

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Review by Ron Reed

Mike Mason thinks different.

Different than me, anyhow.  To clarify the degree of difference, I once asked him what would be his favourite way to spend an hour.  “To sit and contemplate a tree.”  I don’t remember what my response would have been to that question at that time, but if it involved trees, it would have been something more along the lines of climbing them or building a tree fort.  Certainly nothing involving contemplation.

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